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Overall, it has been a muggy summer for us Michiganders, with many days seeing humidity above 90 percent. Fortunately this has made for perfect weather when hitting the lakeshore! However, this has also made us more susceptible to dehydration and if you have been working out, you are even more at risk (Team, G.C, 2013).

I myself have fallen victim to dehydration in the past months. I have not been drinking enough water for my body, activity level, and the temperature and nearly fainted during a kickboxing class. You may be experiencing dehydration, as well, if you have noticed any of the following symptoms (Mayo Clinic, 2016): Extreme thirst, less frequent urination, dark-colored urine, fatigue, dizziness, and/or confusion.

I’ve never truly been worried about proper hydration, but I can assure you it is not something to be taken lightly. Dehydration can lead to severe complications which can even be life threatening. Examples of complications which may occur include heat injury, urinary and kidney problems, seizures, and low blood volume shock (Mayo Clinic, 2016). I believe it’s safe to say we all prefer to avoid any of these complications! So, what are a couple things we can do to prevent dehydration?

  • Fluids, fluids, and more fluids

Continuously consume water-based drinks throughout the entire day with very little to no added sugar or artificial sweeteners. It’s important to note here that the suggested amount of eight eight-ounce glasses per day is not necessarily what your individual body needs. Each person must listen to their body, thirst level and, yes, monitor the color of their urine (Mazziotta, J., 2015).

If you regularly work out, there are several things you can do to prevent becoming dehydrated. One tool provided by Camelbak is their Hydration calculator. You provide information such as your gender, weight, height, age, weather, and temperature, etc., and it provides you with an approximate amount of ounces of water you be drinking per hour. Another way to prevent dehydration is the weight test (The University of Utah, 2017). For this test you need to weigh yourself right before your workout and right after. “If you weigh 150 pounds before exercising, but weigh only 148 pounds after exercising, you have lost two pounds of water weight,” (University of Utah, 2017). It is recommended that to replenish the fluid lost, you should drink 3 cups of water for every pound lost during the workout.

  • Keep track!

There are several creatively cool and easy-to-use apps to keep you on the hydration straight and narrow. The apps can even send you notifications to remind you to drink more water throughout the day. I have used the apps Waterlogged and MyFitnessPal in the past to help track my water intake. If you have a Fitbit or Apple watch, you can also use the apps provided by both companies.

Dehydration is a serious matter and it shouldn’t be taken lightly. Leverage simple guidelines and helpful technology to ensure you are properly hydrated for the times you really need it, like river tubing, boating, hiking, and cycling in the warmer months. Stay safe and drink up, my friends!

 

Stephanie, Health & Fitness Enthusiast

DISCLAIMER: This article is intended to raise awareness on dehydration and should not be relied on for personal medical advice. Please be sure to consult with your doctor on any concerns to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

 

Sources

Team, G. C. (2013, March 20). Dehydration and heat: how hot weather could be dangerous. Retrieved from https://gastrolyte.com.au/dehydration/dehydration-and-heat/

The University of Utah (2017). How to Prevent Dehydration. Retrieved from https://healthcare.utah.edu/wellness/news-resources/dehydration.php

Mayo Clinic (2016, October 29). Dehydration. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dehydration/symptoms-causes/dxc-20261072

Mazziotta, J. (2015, September 16). The Amount of Water You Actually Need Per Day. Retrieved from http://www.health.com/nutrition/the-amount-of-water-you-actually-need-per-day